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Government, Media and Public duped by fake and twisted science

New report analyses the claims of a scientific case to ban hunting with dogs

A report produced jointly by the All Party Parliamentary Middle Way Group and the Veterinary Association for Wildlife Management has demolished the claims that there is any valid scientific evidence to justify the hunting ban. The report The Use, Misuse and Abuse of Science in support of the Hunting Act 2004, will be launched on Friday 27th July in the House of Commons.

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Minister in Second Northern Ireland Gaffe

Government notice on website praising hunting removed and a hint that Hunting Act may be extended to Northern Ireland

Following last week’s embarrassing revelation regarding a Government website for Northern Ireland praising hunting, the Northern Ireland Minister, Peter Hain, has now admitted that his department knew nothing about it. The website notice has now been removed and the Minister has hinted that the Hunting Act could be extended to Northern Ireland. However, the Minister has made a further gaffe by failing to appreciate that the law in Northern Ireland already deals comprehensively with unnecessary suffering to wild animals and allows for cases of cruelty to be brought to court.

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Confused Antis Lose National Trust Battle

League Director argues against Hunting Act

A resolution to prevent the use of up to two hounds to locate and dispatch sick or injured deer on National Trust property on Exmoor was thwarted at the Trust’s Annual General Meeting on Saturday 4th November. The proposer of the motion, League Against Cruel Sports Director Douglas Batchelor, argued that hounds from local hunts should be refused entry in all circumstances, even if to prevent unnecessary suffering to a wounded deer.

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Wildlife Management and Hunting with Dogs

For many years the issue of hunting with dogs has been seen as controversial. Numerous arguments against hunting have been put forward over decades, ranging from morality to class war. However, the most common accusation is that hunting is simply cruel. The chasing of a wild animal with dogs is automatically regarded as an act which causes suffering and the coincidental fact that it is also regarded by followers of the hunt as a sport only attracts further condemnation.

The Middle Way Group challenges both of these perceptions and seeks to produce scientifically sound information with the aim of genuinely improving animal welfare.

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New report analyses the claims of a scientific case to ban hunting with dogs

A report produced jointly by the All Party Parliamentary Middle Way Group and the Veterinary Association for Wildlife Management has demolished the claims that there is any valid scientific evidence to justify the hunting ban. The report The Use, Misuse and Abuse of Science in support of the Hunting Act 2004, will be launched on Friday 27th July in the House of Commons.

Read more...

Cruelty in Hunting Accusation Fails

Anti hunters score another own goal by admitting evidence would not stand up in court

It has in advertently been revealed that the League Against Cruel Sports charge of cruelty caused by hunting with dogs would fail in court under UK animal protection legislation.

In England and Wales it is an offence to cause any unnecessary suffering to animals. However, this law excludes wild animals. The hunting ban passed in 2004, explicitly banned use of hounds, without the need to prove it is cruel.

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First Huntsman Conviction under Hunting Act 2004

The Animal Welfare Consequences

In August 2006, a West Country huntsman was prosecuted and found guilty under the Hunting Act in a case heard before a judge sitting at Barnstaple Magistrates Court. Though it was not the first case of a breach of this law, it was the first time a hunt official had been prosecuted. In 2007, the case was successfully appealed and the conviction overturned.

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First Anniversary of the Hunting Act 2004

“After decades of wrangling, was it really worth it?”

As the 18th November 2005 marks the first anniversary of the Hunting Act being passing into law via the controversial Parliament Act, Parliamentarians have questioned the extraordinary expense and time spent on this issue in the light of every hunt in England and Wales still operating. Concern has also been raised about the Prime Minister’s political legacy.

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